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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I'm writing to see If any one has had the joy of hitting a railroad tie resulting in a broken tie rod. I replaced the tie rod and checked the control arms and they appear to be ok, but the bike just doesnt feel the same. Does anyone know If the distance measured between the tie rod ends Is the same on both sides or IS it differnet...For alignment purposes...
Thanks..Pedro
 

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It sounds like your alignment is off. You'll have to try to measure the toe setting and set it to around 1/4" out. From there you can fine tune it until it feels right.

I went through this on my Grizzly and the fine-tuning part of it made all the difference. Even though it measured out okay, it still didn't feel right... the handlebars were off a little to one side, so I kept playing with it until it was straight. Feels good now, and I've hit LOTS of stuff on that machine and at least three sets of tie rods.

On my Rincon, fortunately, I haven't bent anything yet.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rob thanks for the reply. Do you think It's possible that I may have bent one of the control arms? They look ok just looking at them. As far as the alignment goes I was told to measure the length of tie rod between the two tie rod ends on the other side of the bike and to set the gap the same on the rod I replaced. I did this and It was toed out quite a bit. Are these lengths different on each side. Also I have tried the bike on pavment after tweaking and the bike steers easy and tracks straight even with braking. I also only really notice the a difference when the bikes in 4x4..Does anyone know the easiest way to set the alignment....thanks hoss..
 

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What exactly are you feeling in 4WD?

The tie rods are the same length... and I don't think the control arms are bent. Honda's stuff is pretty stout.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It may be just paranoia being the bike Is less than a month old but It feels as If it is pulling to the left when the suspension compress. I think I'm gonna relax at least until all the ice up here disappears..not very good to test. Bike seems to be fine on asphalt...Thanks for the reply...hoss
 

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Hoss 83

I have not yet had the need to readjust the toe-out or in on my Rincon but I have done it at least a dozen times on my Foreman. I can only assume that the procedure would be the same.

You can go down a straight road with too much toe-out. It will wear your tires out prematurely and feel funny during turns. A little toe-out is desired for 4-wheel pulling, too much is bad.

I do mine by first making sure my handlbar is absolutely square with the bike. Not aimed right or left.

I get a long straight edge and hold it against the front and rear outside edge of the rear tire and measure the distance that the front and rear of the front tire is from the straight edge. You can also use a string but it is more of a pain to do it that way.

Determine what the desired toe-out for your bike is and adjust the linkage until you've got the desired distance. Tighten it up and set the lock nut. Do the same for the other side.

If you do a search on the highlifter forum, I think there is a guy there that goes into a lot greater detail. Good luck, it's pretty easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Zenman, thanks for the reply, I've been real busy have not been able to tweak it yet. Let you know soon. Thanks for the advise...hoss
 

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Hello hoss83
you wont' be able to align your rincon using the string method or with a long stick simply because the back wheeel are wider than the front and that will make your front wheel to have to much toe-in and your bike will be quick on steering. Try making yourself a tool that will measure the back center of the front wheel and the front center of the same front wheel,i did it to mine and the alignment is now perfect.If you have a friend that does bodywork he could be a great help those guys are use to do lots of measurement on those new unibody cars.Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Miner, Thanks for the info. Even though the rear tires are wider, couldn't you still use a staight edge and figure an offset by measuring the front and rear edge of the front tire until they are equidistant. Once they are even, couldnt you then toe out until the distance Is approx 1/4" less on the front edge of the tire? I really appreciate your advise. Could you go into greater detail as to your method, I'm a little confused. Thanks to all...hoss
 

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Hi hoss83!
Look at my pics i was able to get you some good info on alignment.Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Miner, Thanks for the pics, Hey Zen when you did the alignment, did you jack the front end off the ground or did you adjust while on the ground. I started to adjust today not to sure I like the result. I think I toed out too much. Once you square both tires (front tire measurement same front and rear of tire) how much do you toe out. Thanks hoss...
 

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Hey There Hoss!

This is just my opinion but I found it easier to do it with the tires on the ground. It provided some resistance so my handlebar did not move around a bunch while I was working on it. It is also MUCH easier if you have somebody hold the straightedge while doing this!

As far as how much to toe it out, I think I used to keep my 28" Gators about three eighths of an inch out. I know that does not sound like much but it worked well on the Foreman. If you are running stock tires on the Rincon, I would go with the factory recommendation.

I don't mean to insult your intelligence but perhaps you're making this harder than it needs to be. Heres the gist of it in a nutshell. Square the handlebar. If you need to jack it up so you can get at the adjustment nut, take a couple of heavy zip straps and strap each side of your handlebar to your front rack so it will stay square while you are under there.

Loosen the adjusting nut on the tie rod.

Measure the distance that the front and rear of the front tire is from the straightedge. For example. If the front of the tire measures two inches from the straightedge and the rear of the front tire measures 2 and three eighths, you have three eighths inch of toe out. If that is the amount of toe out that you want, tighten it up and do the other side the same way. If you have the handlebar completely square, this method will work fairly well. Due to variations in things such as tire pressure, bent rims, etc., there is a need for a little dead reckoning during this process as well.

I have been using this process effectively for a bunch of years and have not had any problems. The more you do it the easier it becomes. I used to change mine just before major mud runs to provide for more toe out. It was terrible for running down the road but helped pulling out of those deep sloppy ruts!

If I can be of any help, feel free to pm me and I'll give you my cell number and maybe walk you through it.
 

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Hey There Hoss!

This is just my opinion but I found it easier to do it with the tires on the ground. It provided some resistance so my handlebar did not move around a bunch while I was working on it. It is also MUCH easier if you have somebody hold the straightedge while doing this!

As far as how much to toe it out, I think I used to keep my 28" Gators about three eighths of an inch out. I know that does not sound like much but it worked well on the Foreman. If you are running stock tires on the Rincon, I would go with the factory recommendation.

I don't mean to insult your intelligence but perhaps you're making this harder than it needs to be. Heres the gist of it in a nutshell. Square the handlebar. If you need to jack it up so you can get at the adjustment nut, take a couple of heavy zip straps and strap each side of your handlebar to your front rack so it will stay square while you are under there.

Loosen the adjusting nut on the tie rod.

Measure the distance that the front and rear of the front tire is from the straightedge. For example. If the front of the tire measures two inches from the straightedge and the rear of the front tire measures 2 and three eighths, you have three eighths inch of toe out. If that is the amount of toe out that you want, tighten it up and do the other side the same way. If you have the handlebar completely square, this method will work fairly well. Due to variations in things such as tire pressure, bent rims, etc., there is a need for a little dead reckoning during this process as well.

I have been using this process effectively for a bunch of years and have not had any problems. The more you do it the easier it becomes. I used to change mine just before major mud runs to provide for more toe out. It was terrible for running down the road but helped pulling out of those deep sloppy ruts!

If I can be of any help, feel free to pm me and I'll give you my cell number and maybe walk you through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hey Zen, Thanks for the advise. I aligned the rinny today and all went well. I started with approx 3/16 " toe out on both side and then rode the bike. From there I noticed the bike pulling slightly to the left. I then tweaked it a little and It feels pretty good and tracks nice and straight. Thanks again for the help...hoss
 
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