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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy y'all. I just picked up a used '05 Rincon, one in the dark green.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Hood Automotive tire
Low mileage garage machine, but it appears the most recent owner was a little rough on it. Nothing too bad, but I've already broken a tie rod end without even getting in really rough terrain. Albeit the part that broke is definitely not a honda OEM. But anyway, I've decided to go ahead and service the vehicle. I was wondering what all maintenance I should do.

This is what I've got so far, but let me know if there's something I'm missing. I'm not only new to owning a Rincon, this is the first machine I've ever owned. I've ridden a good bit, but it's always been on a buddy's beat up loaner that they don't even change oil in or what is referred to in the south as a "Beater".

1. Tie rod ends. But I was also wondering if any of the aftermarket "upgrades" are really worth it.
2. Wheel bearings. Machine has just over 1100 miles. I figure they're due. Correct me if I am wrong.
3. Oil change and filter change. Is is worth upgrading to the honda synthetic?
4. Transmission. I'm unfamiliar with the transmission. Should I just top off the fluid or does it need changed or filter?
5. Fuel filter change.
6. Air filters. Are these worth upgrading over OEM?


Best I can tell the carb is fine. The machine had loads of torque and power. The throttle is a little soft, but I've also heard the spring in the carb is exceptionally long. It has an aftermarket exhaust of some kind, but the previous owner admitted he didn't put in a new jet. I'm unsure of the exhaust's brand, but it does appear to have three allen screws to remove for a spark arrestor, which I think needs cleaned?

As I said, I'm a new owner. If there's anything else I should do while I'm at it, just let me know.
 

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Hi
Here are some answers, others may chime in with other experiences.
1. Tie rod ends. But I was also wondering if any of the aftermarket "upgrades" are really worth it. Nope. Keep it Honda for parts. Do the job once with OEM while others do it 3 or 4 times with after market (stuff like wheel bearings) actually costing more in time and sub standard materials.
2. Wheel bearings. Machine has just over 1100 miles. I figure they're due. Correct me if I am wrong. You can easily test for bearing wear with the 12/6 grab and the 9/3 grab. Lift the quad, grab the wheel at 12 and 6 and see if there is back and forth movement. Then grab the wheel at 9and 3 o'clock push and pull to see if there is any play. If there is, also inspect the a arm bushings, tie rods and ball joints as they may be loose making it seem like a wheel bearing.
3. Oil change and filter change. Is is worth upgrading to the Honda synthetic? Many riders use synthetic. As long as the oil is for power sports and has the same spec as the GN4 oil, you are good to go. I use AMSOIL, great stuff. https://www.amsoil.ca/lookup/atv/2005/honda/fourtrax-rincon/650/?volume=metric-volume
4. Transmission. I'm unfamiliar with the transmission. Should I just top off the fluid or does it need changed or filter? The transmission is a 3 speed automatic automobile type transmission that uses the engine oil to function. This is the main reason you warm up the Rincon prior to riding, as the transmission likes warm oil (it is thinner as it heats up) Jump on start and take off may cause a slipping clutch until the oil has reached temp. Also important to have the oil level properly checked (Please look in the user manual, and read it for all the basics on your Rincon.)
5. Fuel filter change. Strainer on the bottom of the tank (the petcock) for the age of the Rincon, might want to clean the petcock screen, flush the tank and add a small inline filter.
6. Air filters. Are these worth upgrading over OEM? You may get discussion on this one... K&N don't filter well enough IMHO, the stock filter is easily maintained and if you life in a very dusty place, an outerwear filter can be added.

Most of us 03-05 owners did a carb spring cut. Adds a tiny bit of a quicker response. Not necessary if your not messing with jets and idle. Most of us have found the stock Rincon is purrrrfect right out of the box!

Now you have done your homework... get on and go for a ride!!! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi
Here are some answers, others may chime in with other experiences.
1. Tie rod ends. But I was also wondering if any of the aftermarket "upgrades" are really worth it. Nope. Keep it Honda for parts. Do the job once with OEM while others do it 3 or 4 times with after market (stuff like wheel bearings) actually costing more in time and sub standard materials.
2. Wheel bearings. Machine has just over 1100 miles. I figure they're due. Correct me if I am wrong. You can easily test for bearing wear with the 12/6 grab and the 9/3 grab. Lift the quad, grab the wheel at 12 and 6 and see if there is back and forth movement. Then grab the wheel at 9and 3 o'clock push and pull to see if there is any play. If there is, also inspect the a arm bushings, tie rods and ball joints as they may be loose making it seem like a wheel bearing.
3. Oil change and filter change. Is is worth upgrading to the Honda synthetic? Many riders use synthetic. As long as the oil is for power sports and has the same spec as the GN4 oil, you are good to go. I use AMSOIL, great stuff. https://www.amsoil.ca/lookup/atv/2005/honda/fourtrax-rincon/650/?volume=metric-volume
4. Transmission. I'm unfamiliar with the transmission. Should I just top off the fluid or does it need changed or filter? The transmission is a 3 speed automatic automobile type transmission that uses the engine oil to function. This is the main reason you warm up the Rincon prior to riding, as the transmission likes warm oil (it is thinner as it heats up) Jump on start and take off may cause a slipping clutch until the oil has reached temp. Also important to have the oil level properly checked (Please look in the user manual, and read it for all the basics on your Rincon.)
5. Fuel filter change. Strainer on the bottom of the tank (the petcock) for the age of the Rincon, might want to clean the petcock screen, flush the tank and add a small inline filter.
6. Air filters. Are these worth upgrading over OEM? You may get discussion on this one... K&N don't filter well enough IMHO, the stock filter is easily maintained and if you life in a very dusty place, an outerwear filter can be added.

Most of us 03-05 owners did a carb spring cut. Adds a tiny bit of a quicker response. Not necessary if your not messing with jets and idle. Most of us have found the stock Rincon is purrrrfect right out of the box!

Now you have done your homework... get on and go for a ride!!! :)

Dude, thanks for the expedient reply. I had kinda figured I was going to stick with OEM parts, but some of the aftermarket sure is flashy. ;)

But in all honesty, I thought the transmission took its own fluid. Or perhaps I just looked wrong. I don't have the user manual, I'll have to find one to download after work.

Oh. Forgot one.

7. Make sure electric connections have proper grease applied. (We cross a lot of creeks and rivers here in West Virginia.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Totally forgot, but the parts shops are closed on Sundays and Mondays. But I do have a service manual coming, but who can tell when it will get here even with premium shipping. Project put off a few days until I can get into town for parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Figured I'd give an update: Had to replace tie rod ends, ball joints, bushings, and wheel bearing in front end. Still need to replace the bearings in the upper a-arms where the shocks connect. Turns out I knew far less than I should have known. Rear bearings and bushing still need replaced, but have the parts in hand, just need to find the time to replace them. Found lots of dirt/debris--looks like the previous owner didn't understand how to clean off the machine. The parts that had been replaced appeared to be made of cheapest chininium and were in worse disrepair than the factory parts that needed replaced.

Sorry, didn't mean to gripe.


Good news: When I got into the front end, someone had already swapped out the drums for a disc kit, which ended up saving me some money. That was something I had intended on doing. The pads are considerably easier and cheaper to change for an idiot like myself.

Transmission is running and shifting fine. I haven't had a grind since I changed the oil, which hadn't appeared to be changed only added to--black as coal.


Guy who lives down the road from me deals in junk. He has a foreman headlight assembly he says will wire into my machine. I don't have much wiring experience, and it sounded kind of complicated. Might be the wrong place to ask, but does anyone have an idea of what it would take? If it's a couple hours, no big deal. If it's an all day thing...might just get a lightbar. :)

Thanks a bunch!
 

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Good job.
My 03 was bought with 2400 miles. Now 4600 miles.1 front wheel bearing, new carb and front brakes. All Amsoil fluids. The Amsoil ATV 10W40 helped the shifting a lot after I was using Valvoline.
 

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Oilcan and others have steered you in the right direction. I would add...

-air filter - look at it and see if it is yellow foam. They need to be periodically cleaned and oiled again with air filter oil. If it is old, the foam breaks down so get a new one from Honda, they are cheap. An OEM filter uses a metal screen assembly inside it. If it has a K&N filter (pleated red gauze), remove it, burn it, and buy a Honda foam one. You may need the metal internal piece if a previous owner threw it away.

- oil - GN-4 or something like Mobil 1 synthetic for motorcycles or Amsoil. When you change the oil, there is a washer that sticks to the filter element and many of us:rolleyes: have thrown it away. If you put the front wheels up on car ramps or something, you will get almost 4 quarts out of it, with the wheels on flat ground you get about 3 quarts.

- spark plug is Iridium. They last forever. Be careful removing the plug cap, twist to break the seal on the cap first before pulling on it.

- I would check the valves this winter. There is info on this site how. Actually all the maintenance chores are covered here.

- I would do a gear oil change in both the front and rear axles.
 
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I remember Cajunmudbug, in the early days did this. The plate the light mounts to needs some work, but it basically fits, you will need some mechanical mojo, to make the plate fit correct. I believe there is even a vacant terminal to plug it into but don't buy the house because I said so... check on here 3rd headlight completed A good read with a few tips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Have everything done except for a couple things, and some new things.

Need to replace sway bar bushing and sway bar linkage.

But we have also replaced BOTH front wheel bearings. They fit tight, and we checked them after putting on a few miles and they were right. Have been riding the machine with my nephew lightly, around the yard and up to the end of the dead end street we live on. But one has become rather loose already, to the point it needs replaced. I haven't wrecked, and I haven't run the tire into anything. Even the other one is beginning to develop a little play.


I was just wondering what could be causing this. EVERYTHING on the front has been replaced. I was just wondering if it might be an issue with the axle causing my bearings to go out so quickly. They were moose brand, sold to me by the guy at the honda shop. Is this parts issue, or what? I'm just at a loss. Wheel bearings should not go out in 40-50 miles of yard riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Have everything done except for a couple things, and some new things.

Need to replace sway bar bushing and sway bar linkage.

But we have also replaced BOTH front wheel bearings. They fit tight, and we checked them after putting on a few miles and they were right. Have been riding the machine with my nephew lightly, around the yard and up to the end of the dead end street we live on. But one has become rather loose already, to the point it needs replaced. I haven't wrecked, and I haven't run the tire into anything. Even the other one is beginning to develop a little play.


I was just wondering what could be causing this. EVERYTHING on the front has been replaced. I was just wondering if it might be an issue with the axle causing my bearings to go out so quickly. They were moose brand, sold to me by the guy at the honda shop. Is this parts issue, or what? I'm just at a loss. Wheel bearings should not go out in 40-50 miles of yard riding.

Not axle, I meant the front wheel hub. My apologies.
 

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Honda uses an NTN bearing. Hecho en Japón

Did the bearing drop in or did you press/hammer it in? Make sure it's not a tie rod or ball joint, Steering shaft bearing, they will make the wheel seem loose too.

Many of us have tried the "All Balls/Moose" products with no success.

I have ruined 2 knuckles that way. I've said this before, "pay once for an OEM replacement and carry on, OR, think you save a few bucks buying ROC parts, then finding their life is much reduced by poor quality." So you actually use two or more times the "time/effort". If you continue, buy a second bearing of the same brand more frequently which equals a more expensive course than had you just put the OEM part in, in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Honda uses an NTN bearing. Hecho en Japón

Did the bearing drop in or did you press/hammer it in? Make sure it's not a tie rod or ball joint, Steering shaft bearing, they will make the wheel seem loose too.

Many of us have tried the "All Balls/Moose" products with no success.

I have ruined 2 knuckles that way. I've said this before, "pay once for an OEM replacement and carry on, OR, think you save a few bucks buying ROC parts, then finding their life is much reduced by poor quality." So you actually use two or more times the "time/effort". If you continue, buy a second bearing of the same brand more frequently which equals a more expensive course than had you just put the OEM part in, in the first place.
No, everything fit well. I had to hammer the bearing in, the knuckle is fine. OEM part was on backorder. all linkage and steering is fine.

These are parts suggested to me by the parts guy at the local shop. Said moose was "pretty good". :(

So you think it's just a crappy part, not a bad wheel hub?
 

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Pounding in a bearing has it's risks. Moose and all balls are the same junk (IMHO) Your Honda sales guy would be the next stop and ask him about the bearing warranty. As I said, press in an NTN bearing (or use the freezer method) and be done with it, unless of course your riding in water/mud all the time, then in that case the bearings (no matter what brand) will not last as long.
 
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