Honda Rincon Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I couldn't stand it anymore and went for a ride on Sunday. It had been to long and I just had to get out for a while. The problem was, I got the urge about noon, and the temperature outside was over 105°. I just took it easy, played on a few hills, and just had a little fun. The good part was the Rincon never even came close to overheating. The fan only came on every now and then, when I stopped and got a drink a few times and restarted the engine, the temp light did not come on indicating that it was too hot from sitting. Overall I was quite relieved especially after all the threads concerning the temp problem. The power was there ("O" rings), It shifted great (the herky-jerky from a dead stop issue) etc. Reading too many problem threads here can make you crazy. It is a great source of information if you have a problem, just don't create a problem that doesn't exsist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Paul,
I agree with you. I have riden mine at a slow pace up and down hills and the fan kick in once in a while and after I let it sit after riding. What I do is use the kill switch instead of turning the ignition off. This will allow the fan to run for a few minutes. I then turn the key off. I probably don't have to do this, it is just something I started doing. I also have not had any of the problems that some people are experiencing. I just don't push it to extremes by doing wheelies, deep mud, racing, etc. I drive it like the old Willy Jeep's that I owned.

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know exactally what you are saying. I started out with 4wd's in the early 70's moved on to other toys, 3 wheelers, early 4 wheelers, and always a dirtbike or two that I ran pretty hard, mostly CR500's. Now I OFTEN catch myself riding the Rincon, and thinking like, I was driving my 1978 FJ-40 Toyota Land Cruiser or the M151A1 military jeep. I like going through the rough technical stuff at a slower pace, not like I have an appointment to keep. To each his own, but at this point of my life I really like the slower pace. Everyday living is fast enough and riding the Rincon is a way to "decompress".

That is a good idea about using the kill switch and then turning off the key later. This would be a good idea for a quick stop for when you aer going to take off again.

Are you still coming out to ride Utah this summer? I think I am going to do some short rides up on the Piute here pretty soon and then maybe take two weeks the end of August and do Richfield or Otter Creek area.

PS-- I bought the Land Cruiser in 1978 BRAND NEW off the lot with 3 miles on it for $7000 even, the same price I bought the Rincon for. Man, how times have changed..

Paul..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Paul,
I am coming out for the jamboree in September. I read about it and decided that I don't know anybody out there, this would be a great way of sightseeing and still have other riders nearby. I fondly remember my 1964 Willy's CJ-5. It had a 5.56 ratio, manual throttle and choke. If you went in low range, low gear, you could walk beside it. At 45 MPH the little 4 cylinder was screaming. Then they ruined them by putting the bigger engines in them and making them go fast. This made them unsafe and the insurance rates reflect that. I am 55 and the Rincon is my first ATV. I am past the wheelie, fast mode of my life. I realized I was mortal after all. Now I just want the slow things in life. I have basically quit hunting with a gun and enjoy just watching the animals do their thing. Love photography, etc. At any rate, I will be out that way on September 11 (Richfield, UT) for the week. If I can I was thinking of either going to Nevada first or stop at Moab on my way out. I hope someday to meet and ride with you, Brad, Mike, Cat and Rob. I keep looking for jobs in Nevada but not lucky so far. I wouldn't mind retiring out there.

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Will you guys please quit talking about me.

That is I'm a 55 year old and my first quad is also the Rincon. I like to take it slow and enjoy nature much more than riding fast and playing in the mud.

I guess we all get that way as we mature (nice way of saying we are old farts).

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ridge Runner,

Moving to Las Vegas was an easy transition at one time. Housing was affordable, land was affordable, and the general cost of living was affordable. In the last few years, all that seems to have changed drastically. The southwest in general has become a magnet for the rest of the country. While the "Rust Belt" and some other parts of the country are losing population, the southwest and particularly Phoenix and Las Vegas are experiencing explosive growth. The median cost of a home in LV is nearly $250,000 and let me tell you, if you were use to a large home with some ground, you would be amazed what these folks are getting for that kind of money. 1200 to 1500 sq.ft. homes on a plot so small you can not, literally, get a wheelbarrow around your property line. The cost of land where you can build is around $100,000 to $150,000 per 1/2 acre. With the drought, and Lake Mead down to 50% capacity (80% of LV water comes from the lake) water rates are through the roof. Electric rates are at an all time high as well. The people just keep coming though. You need to leave a home with LOTS of equity, or land a real high paying job (very tough because of the competition). The sprawl has now spread outside the metro area to places like Mesquite, Moapa valley and Pahrump where it is driving up land and home prices as well. These are 100-mile commutes though, and gas here is about $2.10 to $2.20 a gallon.

I was very luck and have been here quite a while. I bought my present home, which was out in the boonies 10 years ago, for $225k. It is 2/3 acre, on a well, and so on, now is worth $700k. There is no way I could come close to affording it now if I were just coming in. Like I said in another post "Times have sure changed!"

Paul...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
Let me get you guys a blanket and a pillow. LOL, I'm 53 and I'm a long way from cashing in on all the fun. I mud up past the seat, submerge the whole rinny in water run up inclines till it rolls over backwards, and crank it out to the limiter. I do all I can while I can.....too late later. Hey everyone have fun, that's what it's all about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A blanket AND a pillow.....I'm ready for a nap...zzzzzzzz!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Paul and John,
I am ready for a nap also. I have had my glory days when I was younger, now I just enjoy life the best I can.

Paul,
I had no idea that it was that expensive out there. It appears to be way overpriced. It is relatively cheap in Atlanta (actually outside of Atlanta) with gas prices back down to about $1.65.

John,
I am orginally from northwest PA (Bradford) and moved down here in 1991. I am looking for a place to move to where I can get a small house, big garage (barn) for my hobbies, and enjoy myself.

I am amazed at all the riders that measure how good their Rincon is by how long they can wheelie, how fast they can go, what machines they can beat, how much mud they can do, etc. I outgrew that a long time ago. Like I said earlier, I realized I was mortal and it got expensive due to repairs. They will get over it also. It appears that neither of you have had any major problems with your Rincon. I haven't. I really enjoy mine and after riding with friends that had other makes and models. I am glad I got the Rincon. It is a pleasure meeting both of you here. We will undoubtedly talk more.

Thanks
John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Gee Paul I had no idea it had gotten that expensive in Vegas.

When I was stationed there at Nellis AFB back in 69 to 72 you could get an very nice home on a nice lot for under $50,000 and electricity was dirt cheap because of Lake Mead and the Hover Dam. Of course that was when we also had gas wars there and I paid as low as 19 cents a gallon.

I now understand what my grandfather was talking about when he talked about the good old days of his era. I guess history just keeps repeating itself over and over. It just seems to look different from each generations perspective. I'm sure in 30 years the young people in Vegas will be saying remember the good old days when you could get land around here for under $200,000 a hal acre.

John, there is still a lot of wide open country to here in Ohio that you can do exactly what you are wanting. Plus we have some great places to ride. I also have heard that 8 out of 10 people in PA have a quad, so there must be plenty of places to ride there to.

Talk to you both soon,
John
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top