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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the complaints about my Rincon are poor front brakes. I dunno if it's just the fact that they're drums, or because of something else. They just don't work real well.

When it was at the dealer earlier this week for the tranny pressure test, I mentioned this, and the service dipshit made it clear that he didn't care, when he said I probably couldn't have it back this week becaues "Honda may not release it if the brakes aren't working right." What a dumbass. They do work, it's just that it requires LOTS of pressure to stop the machine.

I'm wondering if they're all this way, or if mine does have a problem? I've already pulled the drums once (right after I got it) and roughed up the pads and the insides of the drums a bit with sandpaper, and that did nothing.

I don't ride through water or mud so there's no water or corrosion in there.

Basically, if everybody's is like this, then I'll leave it alone until I can afford to do a disc conversion. Otherwise maybe there's something I can work on, since it's obvious that my dealer won't be of any help.

Rob
 

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On mine, the single rear disc provides more stopping power than both the fronts. I wrote it off as being the drums vs. discs. I too am going to put discs on the front, it is just a matter of time and money... but then again, isn't it always?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mine is the same way... the rear is far better.

Yep, money is the big thing. But for me it's one other thing too -- Highlifter is the only one producing a disc brake kit, and I flat REFUSE to buy ANYTHING from Highlifter ever again. So what I'll do is come up with my OWN conversion. My plan is to use Grizzly 660 front brakes and hubs (since the bolt pattern is the same), and replacement parts and pads will be easy to find.

And since I already have a Grizz, R&D will be easy. :)

Rob
 

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my drums are fine.....in fact i would rather have them than disks.....much cheaper to maintain....i have heard of ppl with didks going through them in 2-300 miles.....that sucks.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I agree that drums will last better if you do a lot of mud or very dirty/murky water riding. But for us Western-USA types, that's not really an issue. My Grizzly, for example, has over 3400 miles on it and is still on the original pads. I have a brand new set of pads for it too, and measured the thickness of them and compared them to the stockers and the stockers are still over 50% new.

The rear pad on that thing is so thick that I'll probably have to replace the rotor at the same time as the pad, which will be sometime around 2015. ;)

Rob
 

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Rob, my front drums will lock up the tires but you have to get on them quite hard,wonder if putting on braided stainless brake lines (like on a road bike)would help (to keep rubber line from expanding). My rears will throw you over the handlebars.
 

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Rob,

I have no problem with mine or my brothers rinny in the brake department. He rides a little more mud areas and has had to replace the rear pads, but no problem with the fronts. The "Big Bore Shootout" in this months atv mag put the rincon brakes second to the new Kawi/Suzuki 700 (just because its new). I do agree however with the braided lines. In the hard core 4x4 league of lifted and modified trucks, it's a must....Makes a lot of difference when the tire/wheel weighs 150 lbs's or more...............
 
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