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go look at one. Like comparing a midget to a giant.... er fer you politically incorrect... a vertically challenged to someone who's shoulders you could stand on for a better view ;p
 

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I own both and I prefer the Rubicon. First let me say that I do not ride fast so speed is not an issue for me. I ride mostly trails on the weekend and do not plow snow ever (live in Arizona). The Rincon shakes when the engine idles. The foot rests on the Rincon are flimsy, especially on the front edge. The Rubicon that I own has Electronic Power Steering which is nicer. The Rincon has a catalytic converter that sucks power from the engine. the seat on the rubicon is a lot nicer for longer rides. I rode the Paiute trail a few weeks ago and was on each machine for extended periods of time. It it were my money I would get the Rubicon hands down. In fact I am working on selling the Rincon.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Being this is my first ATV I can only give my experience on a Rincon.
Having ridden older motorcycles I know what vibration is.

So far I'm happy with this Rincon.

I have a neighbor that is a part timer (summer only) that has 2 Rubicons. A 2003 and a 2007.
I will be comparing these to my Rincon once he gets here and gets them out.

:)
 

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The Rincon has independent rear suspension, liquid cooled 4 valve single cylinder. 3 speed auto with torque converter. Suspension is excellent, and it will fly over rough terrain, or you won’t realize how rough the trail is until you run something else. No low range and kinda high geared, so not a lot of engine hold back below about 12mph, and a gear reduction kit would be good if you wanted to go to huge tires/mud.

Earlier Rubicons were solid rear axle, with a hydrostatic transmission. Excellent for towing and plowing. Single piston 4 valve liquid cooled. Solid rear axle rides rougher but less body roll, doesn’t sag under hitch weight of a trailer.

Newer Rubicons are dual clutch transmission and have independent rear suspension.
 

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I have an 07 Rincon and 04 Rubicon. The former has IRS, the latter solid rear axle.

Rincon is BY FAR better in the trails. It is not a good work quad at all though.

The Rubi is so-so on the trails (our trails are rocky here), but it is a fantastic work quad.

Hope this helps
 

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My step-dad has an '07 Rubicon. The tranny has five forward gears, and three modes of operation: D1, D2, and ESP. Don't quote me exactly, but I believe D1 is only gears 1-3 and D2 id 3-5. I'm probably wrong, but D1 definitely has more low end grunt, but less speed. ESP lets you use all five gears. It also has low range to add to these modes. His has the solid rear axle and beats the piss out of me when I ride it, but it does really well for plowing snow. It got a real workout this winter. The Rubicon also has a headlight on the handlebars, and it comes with a brush guard around the lower headlights. It has a single taillight with a storage compartment behind it, along with the left front fender.


The Rincon as stated before has independent rear suspension, three forward speeds with the choices of Auto or ESP, and no low range. Your choices are D, N, or R. The Rincon rides very smoothly and is very quick. There is no upper headlight or rear storage compartment, only the front left fender.


I've ridden both, and we have had both for 10 years or more. I'd take the Rincon over the Rubicon for almost everything but utility. I'd stick to the Rubicon for plowing, moving heavy trailers, but you will not see me on the trail with it. I have a lot more fun on the Rincon, but that may be because I don't have to return it to my step-dad :D
 

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Rubicons of that era use a hydrostatic infinitely variable transmission. As far as I know, the only ATV with that type of transmission (usually seen on tractors). In ESP mode, it emulates gears by letting you select between 5 ratios.

They are excellent for plowing, towing, hauling. Sometimes you see issues with an angle sensor and shift motor that moves the swashplate that controls gear ratio.

Generally, as long as they are maintained they seem to be very durable.
 
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